Tuesday, April 24, 2018

Sound Basics, Audio Recording and Sound Effects

The next unit is "Digital Audio." Before you start working on the assignments, you will first explore the basic science of sound and audio recording

A sound wave can be represented as a waveform which graphically describes the shape of the wave.
Sound waves can be either Non-Periodic or Periodic.

Non-Periodic consists of a single wavefront that quickly dies out (for example, a hand clap).
Periodic sound waves are created by the vibration of an object (for example, a guitar string or tuning fork)

PART ONE OF TWO: The Science of Sound 
and Audio Recording

Below are videos that explore the basic science of sound and audio recording. 
Watch and listen carefully as you will answer questions for each video. 
Remember: If you are uncertain about the answer to the question, you can watch the video section again before answering. 


Video 1 of 4 - Understanding Sound Waves



Video 2 of 4 - Sound: Crash Course Physics #18


Video 3 of 4 - Analog vs. Digital As Fast As Possible.


Video 4 of 4 - Codecs and Formats Explained


PART TWO OF TWO: Foley Sound and Sound Effects

Below are videos that explore Foley Sound and Sound Effects

Foley is a "sound effects technique for synchronous effects or live effects. The Foley technique is named for Jack Foley, a sound editor at Universal Studios
Watch and listen carefully as you will answer questions for each video. 
Remember: If you are uncertain about the answer to the question, you can watch the video section again before answering. 

Video 1 of 2 - What is Foley Sound


Video 2 of 2: Foley Artists: How Movie Sound Effects are Made"